Courses

Acquisition of Sign Languages

Diane Lillo-Martin, University of Connecticut
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

This course summarizes research on the acquisition of the natural sign languages used predominantly by Deaf communities, with a focus on data from American Sign Language (ASL).

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African American English

Lisa Green, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM

Clausal Arguments in Bantu and Beyond

Claire Halpert, University of Minnesota
Monday/Thursday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

How are clauses able to function as arguments of a predicate? What syntactic requirements must hold—of the predicate and/or the clause—to permit this relationship? What strategies do languages use to introduce clausal arguments—and what are the implications of these strategies for other aspects of the syntax? In this course, we will investigate these and related questions through the lens of the Bantu language family. more

Combinatory Categorial Grammar: An Introduction

Mark Steedman, University of Edinburgh
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

Computational Phonology

Giorgio Magri, National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS)
Monday/Thursday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

 

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Constructed Languages

Andrew Byrd, University of Kentucky
Brenna Byrd, University of Kentucky
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

This course provides an overview of constructed languages (or conlangs), which do not arise naturally but are rather consciously created.

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Construction Grammar

Martin Hilpert, Université de Neuchâtel
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

Corpus Linguistics

Amir Zeldes, Georgetown University
Nathan Schneider, Georgetown University
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

Corpus data is essential to many approaches to linguistics, including usage-based approaches to grammar, variationist sociolinguistics, and historical linguistics.

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Creole Studies at the Intersection of Theory, History, Computation and Education

Michel DeGraff, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

Dialectology

Joe Salmons, University of Wisconsin – Madison
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM

This course offers an introduction to the study of regional dialects, especially how they develop over time. We'll draw on existing corpus, written and audio data to explore variation and change in structural features, as well as how dialects are perceived and talked about.

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Directionality in Language Change

Joan Bybee, University of New Mexico
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

The similarity of linguistic change across languages is often quite striking, but differences are also apparent. Similarities are of great importance because they reveal how shared human processing and communicative strategies and abilities shape language. Differences may be due to the presence of language-specific forms and structures or to rare types of interactions in change.

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Doing Phonetics Research

Kenneth de Jong, Indiana University Bloomington
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

Despite it's framing as an introduction to phonetics, this course is not a foundational course for all or any particular area of phonetics, but rather is aimed at having us work through the process of forming an idea, and then working through all of the assumptions and issues which have to get dealt with.

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Emergent Morphology

Mark Aronoff, State University of New York, Stony Brook
Irit Meir, University of Haifa
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

How do new patterns emerge in languages?  This question has been subject to a great deal of theoretical speculation but the focus of our course will be empirical, looking at actual cases. We will begin with recent research on exceptions to established patterns. Next we will tackle the diachronic question of how large-scale borrowing of complex words leads to productive patterns, concentrating on the Latinate element in English.

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Empirical Approaches to Elliptical Constructions

Philip Miller, Université Paris Diderot
Anne Abeillé, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

English in Appalachia

Kirk Hazen, West Virginia University (ADS Professor)
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

This course explores the sociolinguistic variation found in Appalachia in order to better understand the social meanings Appalachians create in the 21st century. Students will study English in Appalachia, including its history, sociolinguistic status, and current variations. Questions of identity and education will play an important role in this sociolinguistic course.

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Experimental Approaches to Verb Meaning

Lisa Levinson, Oakland University
Matt Husband, University of Oxford
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

What is the representation of verbs and verbal meaning, and do experimental techniques shed any light on these questions? Experimental semantics is a relatively new domain which brings together longer traditions in theoretical and experimental approaches to meaning. more

Experimental Syntax

Jon Sprouse, University of Connecticut
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

This will be the equivalent of a graduate level methods course in experimental syntax. We will discuss experimental design, data visualization, statistical analysis, and the application of experimental methods to theoretical questions. This course will be hands on. For the first two thirds, we will work through an example acceptability judgment experiment from design to analysis (using R). more

Eye-tracking for Linguistic Research

Kevin McGowan, University of Kentucky
Monday/Thursday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

Field Methods

Lenore Grenoble, University of Chicago
Alliaq Kleist Petrussen, Ilisimatusarfik (The University of Greenland)
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

This course provides an introduction to linguistic field methods. Working with a speaker of a language that the class does not know, we will attempt to determine the structure of the language, including the phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic systems through a combination of structured elicitation techniques, non-verbal prompts, and by analyzing texts elicited from the speaker.

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Formalism for Morphology: A Hands-On Experience

Raphael Finkel, University of Kentucky
Oliver Bond, University of Surrey
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

This class will introduce several formalisms for representing morphology: network morphology and paradigm function morphology, along with web-based tools (KATR and PFME) for converting theories written in those formalisms into paradigm charts. After working through a few examples together, the class will divide into smaller groups, each one working on one language, preferably suggested by one of the group members.

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Genetic Creolistics and Genetic Linguistics

Salikoko Mufwene, University of Chicago
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

In this course we will review the “creole exceptionalism” tradition against the uniformitarian view, according to which creoles have emerged and evolved like other, natural and non-creole languages. We will situate creoles in the context of the plantation settlement colonies that produced them and compare their emergence specifically with that of languages such as English and the Romance languages in Europe. more

GIS Mapping for Linguistic Research

Jennifer Cramer, University of Kentucky
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

This course will introduce students to maps, mapping, and mapping language data using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools. Students will be expected to apply the methods introduced in the course to linguistic data. While emphasis will be placed on sociolinguistic uses of such tools, the methods presented could certainly be applied more broadly.

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Historical Sociolinguistics

Mark Richard Lauersdorf, University of Kentucky
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

Hybrid Grammars: Dynamics of Language Acquisition and Change

Enoch Oladé Aboh, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

This course discusses how grammars emerge ontogenetically and phylogenetically.

Traditional approaches to language acquisition and change have typically assumed that children develop a mental grammar that replicates uniformly the linguistic knowledge of the current members of their monolingual speech communities. Therefore, language change must result from external factors (e.g., L2-acquisition).

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Implicational Morphology

Jim Blevins, University of Cambridge
Farrell Ackerman, UC San Diego
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

Intonation and Computation

Julia Hirschberg, Columbia University
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

Intonation and Social Identity

Nicole Holliday, Pomona College
Paul E. Reed, University of South Carolina
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

Intonational variation is one of the least well-understood areas of linguistics, especially in American English. This is especially a challenge due to research in recent years that has described the importance of intonational phenomena for speakers and listeners in presenting and interpreting social-indexical information.

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Introduction to Computational Linguistics

Sandra Kuebler, Indiana University
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

This course provides an introduction to natural language processing and computational linguistics. It is concerned with concepts, models, and algorithms to analyze natural languages automatically. We will look at sentiment analysis, and how to model information that is required for a machine learning approach.

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Introduction to Discourse Analysis

Barbara Johnstone, Carnegie Mellon University
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

Discourse is a focus of study in most of the humanities and social sciences, and discourse analysis is practiced in one way or another by anthropologists, communications scholars, linguists, literary critics, and sociologists, as well as rhetoricians. more

Introduction to Historical Linguistics

Brian Joseph, The Ohio State University
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

This course offers an introduction to the study of language change and language history, focusing on the methods used to identify and analyze instances of change, to reconstruct past language states, and to determine relatedness among languages.

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Introduction to Morphology

Andrea Sims, The Ohio State University
Monday/Thursday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

This course will offer an introduction to morphological theory and morphological analysis. Questions to be explored include: What kinds of meanings and grammatical functions are expressed via morphology in the world’s languages? And how are those meanings and functions mapped to morphophonological form? What are the basic units of the lexicon -- words, morphemes, both? What makes morphological structures productive or unproductive? more

Introduction to Neurolinguistics

Jonathan Brennan, University of Michigan
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

This course introduces the neural machinery behind our ability to speak and understand language. Topics discussed include the brain bases of speech perception and reading, lexical processing, syntax, and semantics. We will draw on a range of state-of-the-art functional neuroimaging techniques, as well as the study of neurological and developmental language disorders. more

Introduction to Pragmatics

Gregory Ward, Northwestern University
Betty Birner, Northern Illinois University
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

An introductory overview of the central areas of Pragmatics, including Implicature/Explicature, Reference, Presupposition, Speech Acts, and Information Structure.

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Introduction to Psycholinguistics

Matthew Traxler, The University of California, Davis

Language scientists attempt to answer four fundamental questions: 1. What does one know when one knows a language? 2. How does an individual access and use that knowledge when producing or understanding language? 3. How did we get this way? 4. What is the neural basis of language production and comprehension? more

Introduction to Semantics

William Ladusaw, The University of California, Santa Cruz
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

Introduction to the goal, methods, and major results of formal semantics within linguistics. An overview of the data of semantics, interaction with pragmatics and discourse, and interface to syntactic structure.Topics explored through lectures, readings, and problem sets.

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Introduction to Sociolinguistics

Penelope Eckert, Stanford University
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

Introduction to Syntax

David Pesetsky, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

This elementary-level course will acquaint you with some of the important results and ideas of the last half-century of research in syntax. We will explore a large number of issues and a large amount of data so that you can learn something of what this field is all about — emphasizing ideas and arguments for these ideas in addition to the the details of particular analyses. more

Introduction to the Khoisan languages of southern Africa

Menan du Plessis, Stellenbosch University
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

The workshops will cover aspects of the typology and syntactic structures of the three main and very different families collectively referred to as southern African Khoisan, and will also touch on their present-day status and community concerns, as well as various controversial theories concerning their affiliations.

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Introduction to Typology

Mark Donohue, Australian National University
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

Language and Education

Anne Charity Hudley, College of William and Mary/UCSB
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

Language and Education will use sociolinguistic and multicultural education lenses to examine and increase the impact of linguistics on educational theory and practice. The course will have an emphasis on both Pre-K-12 and higher education and the scholarship of teaching and learning within linguistics.

July 7th: What is linguistics? What is education? What is multicultural education?

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Language and Law

Ed Finegan, University of Southern California
Keith Walters, Portland State University
Monday/Thursday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

Language and Race

Elaine Chun, University of South Carolina
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

Language as Evidence: Forensic Linguistics

Robert Leonard, Hofstra University
Tanya K. Christensen, University of Copenhagen
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

Language as Evidence: Forensic Linguistics Robert A. Leonard, Hofstra University and Tanya K. Christensen, University of Copenhagen 1. Course description This course in forensic linguistics has an interdisciplinary focus on the intersection of linguistic analysis and the realities of police work, court procedures, case law, intelligence analysis, and the US Constitution.

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Language in Culture

Michael Silverstein, University of Chicago
Monday/Thursday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

Language, Gender, and Sexuality

Lal Zimman, The University of California, Santa Barbara
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

Lexicography

Helene Schmolz, Universität Passau
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

Lexicography is a field of linguistics which is highly relevant for every language learner. Looking up the spelling, meaning or translation of words are activities with which each student is familiar, either for one’s first or second language(s). more

Linguistic Landscapes

Tommaso Milani, University of the Witwatersrand
Chris VanderStouwe, Boise State University
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

The aim of the course is offer an overview of research on linguistic/semiotic landscapes, focusing in particular on the insights that can be gained from a spatial perspective on languages and other meaning-making practices. The course will also present different methodologies that can be employed in analysing languages in public spaces. more

Linguistics Outreach: A Practical Approach to Explaining Linguistics to Non-Linguists

Gretchen McCulloch, All Things Linguistic
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

Do you wish more people knew about linguistics? Are you worried that your explanations are boring? In this hands-on course, we'll analyze linguistics outreach materials such as articles, blog posts, videos, and in-person events to figure out what makes an interesting and accessible explanation that's not oversimplified. more

Morphology of Creole Languages

Fabiola Henri, University of Kentucky
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

Morphophonology

Sharon Inkelas, The University of California, Berkeley
Larry Hyman, The University of California, Berkeley
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

This course will survey morphologically conditioned phonology, focusing on the range of effects exhibited cross-linguistically as well as the range of effects that can occur within a given language. Topics of particular focus will include:  the relationship between morphophonologyand process morphology; interleaving between phonology and morphology; non-derived environment blocking; reduplication; tonal morphology; and more.

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Morphotactics

Gregory Stump, University of Kentucky
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM

The patterns according to which a language’s word forms are internally structured constitute its morphotactics.  In the morpheme-based approaches to morphology that emerged in the twentieth century, a language’s morphotactic principles are constraints on the concatenation of morphemes (a perspective still held by many linguists); in rule-based conceptions of morphology, by contrast, a language’s morphotactic principles are constraints on the i

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Movement in Minimalism

Coppe van Urk, Queen Mary University of London
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

One of the most important findings in syntactic theory is that syntactic structures can be built through a displacement operation, or movement. A key proposal of the Minimalist Program is that displacement and plain structure-building are established by one operation, Merge (Chomsky 1995). This proposal simplifies the theory of structure-building significantly. more

Non-Concatenative Morphology

Thomas Stewart, University of Louisville
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

The primary discourse of morphology has privileged an “assembly” metaphor that trades in segmentable pieces, distributed according to hierarchies and/or templates.

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Perceptual Dialectology

Dennis Preston, Oklahoma State University
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

Philosophy of Language

Ernest Lepore, Rutgers University
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

Though meaning is clearly constrained by grammar, most theorists maintain that what we communicate depends on extra linguistic factors, in particular, on speaker’s referential and communicative intentions; correspondingly interpretation depends on the epistemic cues that help make this intention prominent.

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Phonology

Adam Albright, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM

Polysemy and Syntax

Stephen Wechsler, The University of Texas at Austin
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM

Words are polysemous: a word typically has multiple related senses. The syntax of a word depends on its sense, so the patterns of polysemy are reflected in syntactic patterns. Or should it be seen the other way around? Perhaps the rules of syntax directly generate the different word senses, while also generating syntactic structures. more

Prosody and Syntax: Introduction to Contiguity Theory

Norvin Richards, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

A standard claim in current work in syntax is that languages vary in what kinds of overt movement they exhibit.  We standardly say, for example, that English has overt wh-movement, and Japanese does not; French has overt head-movement of the verb to T in tensed clauses, and English does not; English has movement triggered by the classic EPP, which requires TP to have a specifier, and Italian does not; and so forth.  

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Psycholinguistic and Corpus Approaches to Code-Switching

Melinda Fricke, University of Pittsburgh
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the emerging psycholinguistic literature on bilingual codeswitching.  While codeswitching has long been a topic of study in sociolinguistics and corpus linguistics, it is only recently that psycholinguists have begun to turn their attention to codeswitching phenomena as a tool for better understanding the mechanisms that support (bilingual) language processing.  The study of codeswitc

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Quantitative Methods for Linguistic Research

Natasha Warner, University of Arizona
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

Resumptive Pronouns in Competence and Performance

Elaine Francis, Purdue University
Tuesday/Friday 3:30-5:20 PM

Structural complexity, or depth of embedding, has been a key concept in accounts of both syntactic constraints and processing constraints that affect relative clauses. This course explores resumptive pronouns—a common cross-linguistic strategy for dependency formation in relative clauses—as a rich data source for examining complexity effects in competence and performance. more

Scripting with Praat

Penelope Howe, Rice University
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

Sign Language Linguistics

Ryan Lepic, The University of California, San Diego
Carol Padden, The University of California, San Diego
Monday/Thursday 3:30-5:20 PM

This is a graduate-level introduction to Sign Language Linguistics. We will follow the trajectory of American Sign Language research since 1960. Along the way, we will compare American Sign Language with spoken languages, with other sign languages, and with non-sign gesture.

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Sociolinguistics of the Arab World

Keith Walters, Portland State University
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM

This course will examine current trends in and possible future directions for sociolinguistic research in the Arab world. We'll consider diglossia and diglossic switching; multilingualism (including both indigenous languages and languages of wider communication) and codeswitching; language ideologies, language attitudes, and identity; language and nationalism; and impact of media on the linguistic situation there.

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Speech Play and Verbal Art

Anthony Webster, The University of Texas at Austin
Tuesday/Friday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

This class deals with speech play, poetics, and verbal art from a linguistic and anthropological point of view.

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Statistical Inference for the Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Past

Igor Yanovich, Universität Tübingen
Monday/Thursday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

After the course, you (i) will be able to critically read current literature in linguistic phylogenetics, that is, the science of automatically constructing language-family trees from linguistic data, and in spatial analyses of linguistic data, (ii) will know how to perform phylogenetic and spatial analyses yourself applying already established methods, ranging from descriptive to Bayesian, and (iii) will be well positioned to get deeper backg

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Statistical Modeling with R

Josef Freuhwald, University of Edinburgh
Monday/Thursday 1:30-3:20 PM

Structure of Chatino

Hilaria Cruz, University of Kentucky
Ryan Sullivant, The University of Texas at Austin
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

The Chatino languages (Otomanguean; Oaxaca, Mexico) are notable for having extremely rich tonal systems with productive sandhi and diverse floating tone phenomena. These VSO languages are fusional and feature much non-concatenative inflectional morphology.

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Structure of Hawaiian

David Medeiros, California State University, Northridge
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

Structure of Hmong-Mien Languages

Martha Ratliff, Wayne State University
Tuesday/Friday 1:30-3:20 PM

We will examine phonological inventories, bound morphemes (the few that exist), syntactic structures, and types of expressive/aesthetic language found in languages across the Hmong-Mien (Miao-Yao) family of southern China and northern Southeast Asia. An overview of the internal structure and history of the HM family and its place in the network of language families of the region will also be presented.

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Structure of Muskogean Languages

Jack Martin, College of William and Mary
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

Structure of North Atlantic Languages

Harold Torrence, The University of California, Los Angeles
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM

The Origins of Language

Jim Hurford, University of Edinburgh
Monday/Thursday 11:00 AM-12:50 PM

The Timecourse of Bilingual Phonologies

Ashley Farris-Trimble, Simon Fraser University
Anne-Michelle Tessier, Simon Fraser University
Melissa Baese-Berk, University of Oregon
Tuesday/Friday 9:00-10:50 AM

Worldwide, bilingualism is the norm, rather than the exception. Bilinguals must acquire two distinct sound systems and be able to use those sound systems to recognize words in two different languages.

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Typology of Spatial Representation

Jürgen Bohnemeyer, University at Buffalo
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM

This course offers an introduction into the semantic typology of spatial representations. Semantic typology is the crosslinguistic study of semantic categorization. Recent research has uncovered an astonishing amount of variation in how natural languages represent space. more

Visual-Linguistic Ethnography

Norma Mendoza-Denton, The University of California, Los Angeles
Ashley Stinnett, Western Kentucky University
Monday/Thursday 9:00-10:50 AM